Asset Languages

Writing

Breakthrough

Year 1: I can write or copy simple words or symbols correctly.

Year 2: I can write one or two short sentences to a model and fill in the words on a simple form.

Year 3: I can write a few short sentences with support, using expressions which I have already learnt.

Preliminary

Year 4: I can write a short text on familiar topic, adapting language which I have already learnt.

Year 5: I can write a short text on familiar topic, adapting language which I have already learnt.

Year 6: I can write a text, giving and seeking information and opinions, using a variety of structures.

Intermediate

Year 7: I can write a text eg a report, article or story, conveying opinions and points of view.

Year 8: I can produce formal and informal texts in an appropriate style on familiar topics.

Year 9: I can produce formal and informal texts in an appropriate style on familiar topics.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to use basic range of everyday expressions relating to personal details and needs. Your spelling may not always be completely accurate but your meaning will be clear. You should be able to understand and use a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns. You should be familiar with the writing system of the language. You should be aware of how to address people both formally and informally as appropriate.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to use and adapt learnt language relating to a range of predictable everyday matters. You should be able to write simple text using descriptive language, with spelling that is generally accurate. You should be able to recognise the difference between past, present and future events and be familiar with simple forms of the verb tenses.

On completing this stage:

You should now be comfortable with a range of tenses, and should be able to use language relating to a range of familiar matters. You should be using and adapting language for new purposes. Your spelling should be generally accurate. You should be able to write on familiar matters or in predictable situations using a range of language and structures.

Reading

Breakthrough

Year 1: I can recognise and read out a few familiar words and phrases.

Year 2: I can understand and read out familiar written phrases.

Year 3: I can understand the main points from a short written text in clear printed script.

Preliminary

Year 4: I can understand the main points and some of the detail from short written texts in familiar contexts.

Year 5: I can understand the main points and opinions in written texts from various contexts.

Year 6: I can understand the difference between present, past and future events in a range of texts.

Intermediate

Year 7: I can understand longer text and recognise people’s points of view.

Year 8: I can understand text including some unfamiliar material from which I can recognise attitudes and emotions.

Year 9: I can understand a wide range of authentic texts in familiar contexts.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to understand a basic range of everyday expressions relating to personal details and needs. You should have some understanding of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patters. You should be familiar with the writing system of the language. You should be aware of how to address people both formally and informally as appropriate.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to understand standard language relating to a range of predictable everyday matters.  You should be able to read clear handwritten text. You should be able to recognise the difference between past, present and future events and be familiar with simple forms of the verb tenses.

On completing this stage:

You should now be comfortable with a range of tenses, and should be able be understand authentic texts on familiar matters. You should be able to follow much of what you read on familiar matters or in predictable situations. You should be able to give an oral or written summary or translation of what you have read.

Speaking

Breakthrough

Year 1: I can say and repeat single words and short simple phrases.

Year 2: I can answer simple questions and give basic information.

Year 3: I can ask and answer simple questions and talk about my interests.

Preliminary

Year 4: I can take part in simple conversation and I can express my opinions.

Year 5: I can take part in simple conversation and I can express my opinions.

Year 6: I can give a short prepared talk, expressing opinions and answering simple questions about it, using a variety of structures.

Intermediate

Year 7: I can answer unprepared questions in conversation or following a presentation.

Year 8: I can narrate events, tell a story or relate the plot of a book or film and give my opinions about it.

Year 9: I can take part in a discussion, giving and justifying my opinions and ideas.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to use a basic range of everyday expressions relating to personal details and needs. Your pronunciation may not always be completely accurate but your meaning will be clear. You should be able to understand and use a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patters. You should be familiar with the sound system of the language. You should be aware of how to address people both formally and informally as appropriate. 

On completing this stage:

You should be able to use and adapt learnt language relating to a range of predictable everyday matters. Your pronunciation should be clearly understandable and you should be able to maintain a simple conversation using strategies such as asking for clarification or repetition. You should be able to recognise the difference between past, present and future events and be familiar with simple forms of the verb tenses.

On completing this stage:

You should now be comfortable with a range of tenses, and should be able be use language relating to a range of familiar matters. You should be using and adapting language for new purposes. Your pronunciation and intonation should be generally accurate. You should be able to maintain a conversation on familiar matters or in predictable situations using a range of language and structures.

Listening

Breakthrough

Year 1: I can understand a few familiar spoken words and phrases.

Year 2: I can understand a range of familiar spoken phrases.

Year 3: I can understand the main points from a short spoken passage made up of familiar language.

Preliminary

Year 4: I can understand the main points and some of the detail from a spoken passage made up of familiar language in simple sentences.

Year 5: I can understand the main points and opinions in spoken passages made up of familiar material from various contexts.

Year 6: I can understand the difference between present and past and future events in a range of spoken material.

Intermediate

Year 7: I can understand longer passages and recognise people’s points of view.


Year 8: 
I can understand passages including some unfamiliar material from which I can recognise attitudes and emotions.

Year 9: I can understand the gist of a range of authentic passages in familiar contexts.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to understand a basic range of everyday expressions relating to personal details and needs. You should need to listen several times to get the information you need, depending on how fast and clearly the speaker talks. You should have some understanding of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns. You should be familiar with the sound system of the language. You should be aware of how to address people both formally and informally as appropriate.

On completing this stage:

You should be able to understand standard speech relating to a range of predictable everyday matters, providing that it is spoken clearly and directly. You should be able to recognise the difference between past, present and future events and be familiar with simple forms of the verb tenses.

On completing this stage:

You should now be comfortable with a range of tenses, and should be able to understand authentic passages on familiar matters. You should be able to follow much of what is said at near normal speed on familiar matters or in predictable situations. You should be able to give an oral or written summary of what you have heard.